http://www.ikmultimedia.com/fulltone for more information

IK Multimedia is proud to present the brand new Fulltone® Collection for AmpliTube for Mac/PC, which brings guitarists and all musicians an essential palette of sounds that span from the most classic tones from the past to more modern “waves”.

Guitarist Michael Fuller founded Fulltone back in 1991, with the aim of building stompboxes that sounded as good as vintage pedals, but that were more rugged and reliable than the old, often fragile classics.

Today, Fulltone is recognized as being one of the most committed and scrupulous manufacturers worldwide and IK Multimedia teamed up with them to bring you the finest recreations of 3 select effects you can now use directly in AmpliTube for Mac/PC.

1 week 4 days ago
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Anyone can live stream a DJ set from a smartphone, but producing a professional broadcast requires additional resources. In this episode of "Tips and Tricks," Mojaxx discusses what you'll need to get started, from computers and webcams to software and streaming platforms.

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1 week 4 days ago
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Ivan Jackson and Conor Rayne are BrassTracks, a production duo based out of the Tri-State area who combine everything from funk and R&B to rap and electronic music. They’re the masterminds behind the production on Chance The Rapper’s Coloring Book lead single “No Problems.”

Read more on Genius: https://genius.com/a/the-making-of-ch...

Read all the lyrics to "No Problems" on Genius: https://genius.com/Chance-the-rapper-...

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1 week 4 days ago
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CLICK THIS LINK TO SUB TO NEW CHANNEL: http://bit.ly/1Cvr2FI

DJ Akademiks Speaks on Lez Luger Challenging Zaytoven to a Beat Battle and says 'I'm BETTER THAN YOU BRUH'
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1 week 4 days ago
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QOTD: How can you make money on YouTube as a musician?

There are many different ways in which you can make money with your music on YouTube. If you're a musician and don't yet have a YouTube channel, I would urge you to set one up right away. It's the single biggest tool for music discovery, music promotion, marketing and sales in the world today. So if you don't have a YouTube channel, you're missing out in a major way.

The first and most obvious way in which you can make money on YouTube as a musician, is through advertising and YouTube's own in-house monetization. The way it works is that you can enable YouTube to show ads before, during, after and also next to your video uploads. You then get paid a percentage of every ad view and ad click. So basically, the more you upload and the more popular your videos are, the more money you can be making through advertising. It pays off to be consistent! You can enable monetization for your videos easily by visiting the Channel settings in your Creator Studio.

The second big way in which you can make money with your music on YouTube is by embedding external links inside your own videos and thereby selling your music and merchandise. This is done through Annotations or Cards which are set up in your Creator Studio. When somebody clicks the link you feature in your video, they are directed to your own website or partner site where they can make a purchase. For a musician for example, you can embed a link to your single inside the accompanying music video. If you want to be a little more ingenious about the whole thing, you could also wear your own merchandise in your videos and upsell it from straight within the part of the clip where you're wearing your fancy band t-shirt and snapback.

The third way to monetize your YouTube channel is through sponsorships. Generally this will only be applicable to channels with 10,000+ subscribers or who get a lot of monthly views. The way it works is that companies and brands sponsor you to make a video where you feature, review or otherwise mention a specific product, service or event. For example, as a musician you might be hired by a manufacturer of microphones or headphones to promote the product to your audience. Obviously sponsors will be mostly interested in social influencers that have a large network in order to really make a difference and generate sales for them. Having said that, it's not uncommon to be paid anywhere from $100-10,000 depending on the size of your channel and your influence over the target market of your sponsor. There are a lot of sponsorship platforms out there geared towards matching sponsors with content creators, so browse through those frequently to find opportunities that might be applicable to you.

The fourth method of money making for musicians, once again presupposing you have at least 10,000+ subscribers, is getting paid by other artists and content creators to upload their music and videos to your own channel. The thought behind this is that it can be a great promotion and marketing platform for them to showcase their work to a new fanbase and viewership, particularly if they're just starting out on YouTube and have few subscribers of their own. Some artists hate opening up their own fanbase to other musicians, but for those open to the idea you can absolutely use your personal channel or set up a whole new channel dedicated to promoting other people's work to generate additional income.

The fifth way to make money on YouTube as an artist is to create paid content. You might have already seen this feature inside your Channel settings, whereby you can actually force people to pay in order to watch certain videos. If you have a new album out which you don't want to stream for free you could ask your fans to pay a small fee, for example $0.99, to watch a video or video playlist of yours. Or perhaps you want to create a paid behind an exclusive behind-the-scenes video series for your closest fans. As well as the paid content, there are also ways to ask for donations, create paid live events and other constantly emerging monetization options, so just have a browse through your Channel settings in YouTube.

The sixth and final way to monetize your music is by joining a multi-channel network (MCN). The way that YouTube works is it is split into personal, individual channels and larger, private networks of channels. These are sub groups within YouTube such as BroadbandTV or Maker Studios, which generally hire the best-performing YouTube channels and promise higher advertising payouts, bigger royalties, sponsorships and other revenue generating activities they actively pursue for you.

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Interview
1 week 4 days ago
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QOTD: Should you copyright your music?

This has long been a hot topic issue for artists and producers. Let me explain for a moment how copyright works: the very moment you create a piece of music, whether that's lyrics you penned, vocals you recorded or a melody you composed, you already own the copyright to that music. The issue comes with proving that you are in fact the original creator of that piece of music. When it comes down to it, if you're ever faced with a legal challenge over the ownership of a piece of music, you need to prove beyond reasonable doubt that those lyrics, or that vocal or that melody was in fact created by you and no one else.

There are some obvious ways you can do that. For example, you should always keep save files and backups of your work. Make sure you have all sessions, stems, adlibs, notes and documentation available at all times. Data might be the most valuable asset you have as a musician, so make sure you have everything saved and backed up in multiple locations.

Another way that you can safeguard your music is to register it with your performance rights organization (PRO), such as BMI and Ascap in the US, GEMA in Germany, or PRS in the UK. If you're not yet affiliated with a PRO I would highly recommend doing that right now regardless, as it's the only way you are going to be earning royalties and capitalizing on your music in the long term.

Finally, a lot of artists also register their tracks with the copyright office (https://www.copyright.gov). This is probably the most secure option but it comes at a price - around $35 for a registration. Fortunately you can register your music in bulk, the price is the same whether you register 1 song or 135 songs. So even for independent artists it is an affordable option.

There will be few situations were having a registered copyright for your music is actually going to benefit you, but in a worst case scenario where someone is suing you or you are suing someone else over music ownership, having the security of a formally registered piece of music can be worth putting the extra work in for. Finding yourself in a court room is very rare however, as litigation is time consuming and expensive and most everyone (especially the major artists and labels) will want to avoid this if at all possible.

Be very clear about the following: registering your music with the copyright office will not protect you in any way from people stream-ripping or stealing your music or passing it off as their own. No one is going to enforce your copyright for you online or offilne. If you try to go after the culprits they are just going to disappear into cyberspace. So don't think that my having a piece of paper that formalizes your copyright ownership of a piece of music, this is somehow going to magically protect your work.

One big myth that needs to be crushed for good is the concept of the 'poor man's copyright'. Some artists would have you believe that mailing a self-addressed envelope containing a recording of your music that is time stamped by the post office is a fail-safe way to prove copyright ownership. This is a load of crap. Envelopes can be easily tampered with, stamps tampered with and forgeries created. This will never hold up in a court of law. Don't waste your time.

In summary then - should you copyright your music? Yes, if you have the time and financial means to do so. If not, keeping save files and backups and registering your music with your PRO should be perfectly sufficient.

Subscribe to My Channel and post any questions you have under this video. I will do my best answer all of them for you.

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1 week 4 days ago
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QOTD: What's a better marketing platform for musicians: SoundCloud or YouTube?

As a marketing platform, both SoundCloud and YouTube are extremely important and I feel that every musician should be on both. They are probably the 2 single biggest platforms for people to discover new music today, with YouTube in fact being the largest repository of music in the world today, even though it primarily caters to videomakers. So if you're not on YouTube, get a channel right now. And if you're not on SoundCloud, I would highly recommend that you also sign up for an account immediately.

The reason many people ask me which platform is better is because they don't want to post their music on both. They feel that it would be too much work uploading to and managing both a YouTube and SoundCloud channel. One way around that is to use a service like TunesToTube.com which is a scheduling tool where you can plan your releases ahead of time and it will post your music to both YouTube and SoundCloud at the same time. You'll save a ton of time and can establish a regular, consistent release schedule. Once a week, what I do is schedule all my music for the next 7-14 days. Personally I release one beat a day, so by getting all my scheduling done at once I can then kick back and focus on other things while my audience on YouTube and SoundCloud is engaged daily with new content. So you see, there really is no reason not to be on both platforms!

Having said that, some people still prefer to be on one over the other for various reasons. So if you were only going to post your music on one website I would recommend YouTube. The reason being that YouTube gets the most traffic, it is owned by Google so ranking highly in the YouTube search results also places you front and center in the general Google search results and a huge volume of people are browsing through YouTube casually every single day looking to discover new music. It is hands down the number 1 platform to showcase yourself. Also, SoundCloud is a lot more limited in terms of what you can do beyond simply uploading music and adding it to playlists. On YouTube, there are a lot more discovery features, added content (like live videos, fan sponsorship etc.) and you can even get paid for your uploads through ad monetization and ContentID. As well as just uploading music, you can post daily vlogs, music videos and behind the scenes footage that will engage your fans in a way that you just can't on SoundCloud. Another neat feature on YouTube is that you can embed links to your own website or directly to a purchase page within videos which is great for sending highly targeted traffic your way. On SoundCloud you are limited to posting one single 'call to action' buy link under your music upload, or posting links in the extended song descriptions (which not many people ever read).

So if I had to choose just one platform for music and marketing it would be YouTube, but honestly there is no reason not to be on both SoundCloud and YouTube at the same time!

Subscribe to My Channel and post any questions you have under this video. I will do my best answer all of them for you.

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1 week 4 days ago
0:00

This Tutorial is done by Chaos showing you how to change the start up sound in FL Studio.

Take and apply this same knowledge to your workflow and improve your ability to make beats.

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1 week 4 days ago
0:00

Lex Luger's taking aim at Metro Boomin, Southside (808 Mafia), and Sonny Digital by challenging them all to a beat battle.

Video Blog
1 week 5 days ago
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We're doing a Daily Vlog from SXSW this year with the whole Internet Money team Cooking Up, living together for a couple of days. If all goes well we'll continue to do this everyday even after SXSW. Trying new things. Lets get it.

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Video Blog
1 week 5 days ago
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